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Carlson Meissner Hart & Hayslett | Legal Blog

Apr  30,  2010
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Debbie Moss Election Update from St. Petersburg Times Carlson, Meissner, Hart & Hayslett, P.A. Incumbent Judge Michael Andrews is being challenged by Deborah Moss, who said "my demeanor, my ability to resolve conflict" are among the qualities that would make her a good judge. Moss, 52, has been a lawyer specializing in criminal defense since 1987 and spent 13 years in the Public Defender's Office and a decade in a private firm. She did not criticize the incumbent judge she is running against, but said, "Maybe it's time for a change." Andrews said he has worked hard to be a well-prepared and fair judge who is a public servant in and out of the courtroom. "In 13 years on the bench, I think I've got a distinguished record." Read the complete story, 15 Candidates Begin Race for Pinellas-Pasco Circuit Judge Positions in our Press-Release section.
Tags: attorneys-lawyers-blog-clearwater:attorneys; lawyers; blog; clearwater,circuit-court-judge:Circuit Court Judge,criminal:criminal,debora-moss:Debora Moss,sixth-judicial-circuit:Sixth Judicial Circuit
Posted in announcements:Announcements
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St. Petersburg Times states, Incumbent Judge Michael Andrews is being challenged by Deborah Moss.
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Apr  28,  2010
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Paul A. Meissner, Esquire Carlson, Meissner, Hart & Hayslett, P.A. Our own Debbie Moss has filed qualifying papers in Tallahassee declaring herself to be a candidate for the position of Circuit Court Judge in the Sixth Judicial Circuit (Pinellas and Pasco Counties). Her name will appear on the ballot in the first primary elections to be held just prior to labor day. Debbie is a Board Certified Criminal Trial Lawyer of considerable experience. We all know her to be a very compassionate and passionate advocate for her clients. She is a person of the highest moral character who continually practices her profession with strict adherence to her ethical ability to take positions on issues which might come before them as Judges, and further restricts comments which might be construed as derogatory of the judiciary or any current member of the judiciary.
Tags: attorneys-lawyers-blog-clearwater:attorneys; lawyers; blog; clearwater,circuit-court-judge:Circuit Court Judge,debora-moss:Debora Moss,sixth-judicial-circuit:Sixth Judicial Circuit
Posted in announcements:Announcements
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Paul A. Meissner, Esquire Carlson, Meissner, Hart & Hayslett, P.A. Our own Debbie Moss has filed qualifying papers in Tallahassee declaring herself to be a candidate for the position of Circuit Court Judge in the Sixth Judicial Circuit (Pinellas and Pasco Counties). Her name will appear on the ballot in the first primary elections to be held just prior to labor day.
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Apr  23,  2010
By admin
Use numbers to fight red light camera ticket
Carlson, Meissner, Hart & Hayslett, P.A. The following is one of my favorite news stories: Math Tutor Uses Numbers to Fight Red Light Camera Ticket. A woman was caught on camera running a red in Collier County. But after her husband fought the ticket, it was thrown out. Now officials say there may be other drivers who were wrongly ticketed as well. About 28,000 drivers have been caught on camera running a red light in less than a year. The excuses range from bad weather to not wanting to be rear-ended. But Collier driver Mike Mogil claims the yellow lights are simply too short. And as it turns out, he’s right. Armed with a stopwatch, Mogil may be driving a hole in the credibility of Collier County’s red light camera system. “If the county, they are not going to follow their own rules, then why should we be required to follow the rules?” he asked. When his wife received a ticket in the mail recently, the first thing she said was the yellow light was too short. So Mike, who works with numbers all the time as a math tutor, put it to the test. “I said, ‘If it’s really short, then you got short-changed and you got a ticket illegally,’” said Mogil. The speed limit on Collier Boulevard, where she was cited, is 45 mph. According to county guidelines, the yellow light should be 4.5 seconds. Mogil said he tested it 15 times with an average of only 3.8 seconds. “And I said, ‘We’ve got a problem,’” he said. He challenged the ticket Monday and a special magistrate dropped it when the county conceded the yellow wasn’t long enough. “I think it was an oversight more than anything,” said Gene Calvert of the Collier County Transportation Department. The county has already fixed the Collier Boulevard light, and says it will check 200 other intersections to make sure they meet the standard. NBC2: Do you think there are other lights that may not be timed correctly? Calvert: I doubt it very seriously, but I will be looking into it. But Mogil says he’s already checked 65 intersections and found that only seven yellow lights are long enough. “There’s a much, much bigger issue here and it has to be addressed,” e said. The county says it will be checking the intersections with red light cameras first. They encourage anyone who thinks they may have gotten a ticket incorrectly to challenge it, just as Mogil did.
Tags: attorneys-lawyers-blog-clearwater:attorneys; lawyers; blog; clearwater,caught-on-camera:caught on camera,criminal:criminal,illegal-traffic-ticket:illegal traffic ticket,red-light:red light
Posted in news-and-media:News and Media
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Carlson, Meissner, Hart & Hayslett. Math tutor uses numbers to fight a red light
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Apr  21,  2010
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Grand jury to question officials On the jury's list are the Port Richey city manager and some present or former City Council members. By MATTHEW WAITE © St. Petersburg Times, published March 21, 2001 Interview of J. Larry Hart, Esquire, of Carlson, Meissner, Hart & Hayslett On the jury's list are the Port Richey city manager and some present or former City Council members. PORT RICHEY -- A grand jury investigating the Port Richey Building Department will hear from the city's top administrator on Thursday as well as all or most of the City Council members in place last summer. City Manager Vince Lupo received a subpoena Tuesday morning from the grand jury, and current council members Pat Guttman and Joe Menicola both received invitations last week. Guttman and Menicola both said that former council member Tom Brown also had received a subpoena, but when reached at home Tuesday, Brown wouldn't confirm that. "I'm not at liberty to say anything," he said. The four will join former acting mayor and current mayoral candidate Bob Leggiere and others Thursday to testify before the grand jury, which started its inquiry into the Building Department last week. Also scheduled to appear is Greg Schneider, the former Port Richey Building Official who complained about Leggiere interfering with his work -- which Leggiere denied -- and brought the whole investigation into the public in July. What the grand jury is investigating so far is a matter of secrecy, but in letters to a judge and to Leggiere, the grand jury has said they were investigating "matters in the city of Port Richey" and "allegations of improprieties affecting the Building Department." So far, Port Richey Police Chief William Downs, who started the investigation, and former Building Officials Rune Lero and Ralph Zanello have testified before the grand jury. Neither the grand jury, nor the State Attorney's Office has revealed who or what the target of the investigation is, but issuing subpoenas or invitations reveals who has immunity and who doesn't. Under the law, a subpoena carries with it immunity from prosecution; an invitation doesn't. So far, Lupo, Brown and Downs have been subpoenaed; Leggiere, Schneider, Menicola and Guttman have received invitations. Zanello and Lero's status could not be confirmed by the Times. Menicola said Wednesday that he will go Thursday afternoon with the attorney who represented him when the State Attorney's Office first asked him to come answer questions in October: New Port Richey lawyer J. Larry Hart. Hart was hired by Menicola, Guttman and Brown when state investigators first called. Brown went to the state attorney and answered questions, and quit the council days later. Menicola and Guttman both refused to go without a subpoena, on Hart's advice. Under city ordinances, Hart's bill was paid by local taxpayers. And Menicola and Guttman said they have contacted him again. "I'm not being invited down there as Joe Menicola, the person. I'm being invited down there as Joe Menicola, the councilman," he said. "I'm not going to let myself go unprotected." Guttman said she, like others asked to appear, doesn't know what to expect. "I'm going to go down there and go in and see what happens," she said. Lupo, who went to state investigators twice to answer questions, said he will go without an attorney, largely because a subpoena grants him immunity. "The truth is the truth and the truth will come out," he said. "I never requested a subpoena. I never requested an attorney. I never needed one." [display_podcast]
Tags: attorneys-lawyers-blog-clearwater:attorneys; lawyers; blog; clearwater,criminal:criminal,grand-jury:grand jury,larry-hart:larry hart,new-port-richey:new port richey
Posted in news-and-media:News and Media
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Larry Hart in St. Petersburg Times article "Grand Jury to Question Officials
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Apr  11,  2010
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Terri Cromley, our attorney who heads the Bradenton office of Carlson, Meissner, Hart & Hayslett, was interviewed by the Bradenton Herald regarding the number of applications for disability insurance which are expected to rise, thanks to an aging baby boomer population, the backlog of cases sitting in the offices of the Social Security Administration, and high unemployment rates. The SSA expects 3.3 million people to apply for disability benefits this year, up from 2.7 million in 2009. The article states that the Tampa hearing office, which serves applicants in Manatee and Sarasota counties, has the largest backlog of the five Florida offices. There were 10,002 people waiting an average of 496 days for a hearing in Tampa. Terri F. Cromley, said technological advances at the Tampa office have begun to streamline the process. Case files are available on compact disc, and SSA hopes to put most case information online for attorneys to access in the near future, she said. “It sounds bad,” Cromley said of Florida’s ranking, “but actually they have improved over the past year. Because of that CD and the fact we can scan things to give them cuts down on their workload.” Cromley said her clients wait an average of 16 months for a hearing, compared to 24 months a few years ago. Still, she says, it’s too long to wait when you’re not working. “It’s a horrible process,” Cromley said. “Many of my clients became homeless. If they don’t have a spouse or parents who can support them, they’re out of work for three years. “They ask me, ‘Can’t you just file on a hardship?’ But most people are on a hardship. They only consider it a hardship in an emergency situation.” To read the entire article please go to the Press Release section of our website.
Tags: attorneys-lawyers-blog-clearwater:attorneys; lawyers; blog; clearwater,bradenton:bradenton,social-security:social security,terri-cromley:Terri Cromley
Posted in social-security-disability:Social Security
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Terry Cromley, an attorney with the firm of Carlson, Meissner, Hart & Hayslett, speaks to the press about the backlog of cases at the Social Security Administration.
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